Best Monasteries

The wonderful nation of Nepal, arranged between stunning Indian wildernesses and the hypnotizing Himalaya Mountains, has seen a huge surge of travelers since it opened its borders. It is a homogeneous blend of social legacy, cultural values, untamed natural excellency, and religious communities, making it a well-known objective among climbers, historians, pioneers, and those looking for a peaceful place to meditate. Nepal’s solid connections to Hinduism and Buddhism are obvious in the way that there are countless sanctuaries, temples, monasteries, Mandirs, and cloisters all throughout the country. Aside from being a simple place of love and reflection, the religious communities are models for extraordinary design and historical architecture.

There are numerous delightful monasteries on the planet, however, nothing can compete against the ones present in Nepal. The religious communities of Nepal especially Buddhists are known for their simple living and high thinking, which is practiced by everybody, even the ones who do not practice Buddhism. The practice of spirituality and Buddhism began in Nepal many centuries ago hence when tourists come to visit the monasteries present here they get an opportunity to familiarize themselves with authentic Buddhist principles along with spirituality.

The 5 best monasteries to visit for your spiritual rejuvenation in Nepal are:

  • Kopan Monastery, Kathmandu: Set on the edges of Kathmandu on a slope is the tranquil Tibetan Buddhist religious monastery named Kapan Monastery, which is home to over 300 monks, educators, workers, and lamas. It is perhaps the most visited monastery. Every year countless tourists visit here to concentrate and learn about spirituality and Buddhism. Lama Thubten Nohe established this Kopan Monastery.

The monks here, which are between the ages of 7 and 60, dedicate their whole lives to rehearsing and learning the bits of knowledge of Buddha Shakyamuni. In the event that you are keen on Tibetan Buddhism, you can spend your days with monks learning about spirituality and Buddhism, or you can enlist for one of their courses, which can keep going for as long as 90 days. On the other hand, you can partake in different activities organized by the monastery while enjoying the wonderful Himalayan ranges.

  • Namobuddha Monastery, Simalchaur Syampati: Namobuddha Monastery is one of the most beautiful monasteries with the best monuments of Buddha where people get to enjoy the marvelous natural beauty and get more spiritual. It is one of the most visited tourist spots and it is set 2 miles (42 kilometers) toward the east of Kathmandu.

It is more well known among the Tibetan Buddhists and you can watch monks practicing spirituality every day. The prayer flags and the mountains that surround the monastery make Namobuddha look even more mesmerizing. The Gold Buddha Shrine, the 16 Arhats Shrines, and the Crowned Buddha Shrine make the place even more remarkable.

  • Benchen Monastery, Kathmandu: Acquire bits of knowledge on Tibetan Buddhism and reflect with notable educators and monks at Benchen Monastery. It is situated in Kathmandu, near Swayambhu Stupa, and is run by two learned and well-known Buddhist monks – Ven. Tenga Rinpoche and Sangye Nyenpa Rinpoche. They are viewed as the masters of Tibetan Buddhism along with spirituality and have shared their insight around Asia and Europe.

The grounds of the monastery include a peaceful meditating spot, a free local area clinical center, a school, and a devout school. Besides being a strict motivation, the monastery likewise upholds the local area through free medical aid and work.

  • Tergar Osel Ling Monastery, Nagarjun: Tergar Osel Ling Monastery, home to 100 Himalayan monks, who live learn, and get familiar with the Buddhist philosophical values and meditate, is an ideal spot to interface with spirituality. This convent, which is a Tibetan Buddhist religious community, is set in the peaceful outskirts of Kathmandu.

It was brought to life in Nepal by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, and presently, it is overseen by his two children – Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche and Tsoknyi Rinpoche. While Yongey is centered around teaching Tibetans in the spiritually monastic institute he established in 2010, Tsoknyi focuses his endeavors on non-Tibetans and their concerns with spirituality.

  • Amitabha Monastery, Nagarjun: Relax in the vivid environmental elements, as well as the lovely Nepali dawn and nightfall in this grand Buddhist community, situated on the heights of Druk Amitabha Mountain in Kathmandu valley. Amitabha Monastery is home to the eminent kung-fu monks and has a middle for helpful goals and profound practices.

The monastery includes a lovely vegetable nursery, a permanent place to stay for creatures rescued from butchering, a clinical center, a regulatory office, a library, and a 2,000-seat limit hall. The environmental elements of this, monastery include numerous peaceful climbing trails, and a visit there is a chance for you to acquire knowledge about spirituality and forfeits of these phenomenal people.

Conclusion

Besides getting a chance to learn about spirituality and Buddhism, a visit to these monasteries will be a shocker to those who aren’t familiar with the Buddha way of living. Likewise, a large number of these monasteries to visit in Nepal are set among culturally diverse and naturally rich scenes and mountains, offering more noteworthy serenity, experience, and concentration.

Assuming you are keen on visiting one of these monasteries to respect your family’s spiritual life or yourself, you will be glad to realize that there are many out there. There is

a wide range of Buddhist monasteries in Nepal, so it ought not to be hard to track down one that suits your requirements. The greater part of the monasteries is situated in mountains that are very distant from urban communities, so being there would provide you with the tranquility you’ve never experienced before.

For More: Sherpa: The mountaineering Guide

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